Ivan Tomica

Switching to Leap

This is a short update on the progress of my OpenSUSE experiment. After initial fiasco with OpenSUSE Tumbleweed I decided to switch to the Leap. Reason being, Tumbleweed is not so “stable rolling” after all. My expectations, from marketing and everything, were that OpenSUSE Tumbleweed is basically like Arch, but more stable.

I’m sad to inform, this is not really true. In my experience, Arch has always been waaaay more stable.

Anyhow, without dwelling to much I decided to switch to the Leap to give OpenSUSE proper chance, as I feel many of my issues are caused by really bleeding/cutting edge packages and frequent rate of updates.

The drop that spilled the glass was the latest issue with X11 session (default). So basically my effects got lost, and I had really weird screen effects.

OpenSUSE X11 “effects”

Logging out and back in to “Full Wayland” session made everything work flawlessly again, so I guess something is broken in X11 realm, and I have no real incentive to play with it further.

Now, I only have to convince myself on what the advantages of Leap and OpenSUSE in general might be when compared to Ubuntu or Fedora :-)

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2 Comments

  1. Daulton

    2020-12-28 - 18:58
    Reply

    Hello, just to give some perspective as to what Leap is before frustrations occur like old packages:

    “”Leap” variant shares a common code base with, and is a direct upgradable installation for the commercially-produced SUSE Linux Enterprise, effectively making openSUSE Leap a non-commercial version of the enterprise product.”
    Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenSUSE

    So being that it is essentially SLES, you can think of it much like CentOS or Debian. It can be used as a desktop system, especially if you are looking for stable, reliable, and slow moving, but it really is geared towards servers.

    Just some perspective to help contextualize a bit, if you go into it expecting it to be Tumbleweed but static releases, or similar to Fedora, etc. then you will be a hint disappointed.

    • Ivan Tomica

      2020-12-28 - 19:26
      Reply

      Thanks for the comment. I am aware where the Leap “sits”, and already have follow-up article which basically describes the very same frustrations you mentioned :-D

      Source of some of my frustrations were certainly misaligned expectations. It seems that I try to fit OpenSUSE somewhere it doesn’t belong. I would like to have something in between the Leap and Tumbleweed, and that’s just not available on the OpenSUSE side of things.

      Even if I was to deploy it onto the server, I don’t see many advantages to it over the CentOS (Stream even) or Ubuntu LTS, but that’s whole another use-case. This winter break is all about trying it out as a day-to-day desktop :-)

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